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Did the Detroit Lions improve their roster in 2016? A recap

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Recapping our series on the Detroit Lions roster, we take a look at how the fans voted at each position.

Jeff Hanisch-USA TODAY Sports

Over the past few weeks, we took a closer look at each position to see if the Detroit Lions had bettered their roster over the offseason. For each position, we polled the readers to give their opinion on if they believed the Lions had improved. Below are the individual results:

According to Lions fans, just four positions did not improve during the offseason: wide receiver*, tight end, defensive end and safety. None of that should come as a surprise, as the Lions lost key players at wide receiver and safety (Calvin Johnson and Isa Abdul-Quddus, respectively), and failed to really address the defensive end and tight end positions this offseason.

On the positive side, fans perceive the Lions as most-improved at offensive tackle and defensive tackle, which nicely lines up with Detroit's first and second round selections in the 2016 NFL Draft. Detroit is expecting a big turnaround on the offensive line, as 96 percent of voters believe they improved in the interior of the line. It's hard to argue against that majority. Just look at all of the new players the Lions have along the offensive line, who each have a chance to contribute this year: Geoff Schwartz, Taylor Decker, Graham Glasgow, Joe Dahl. However, it is worth mentioning the Lions were perceived to have improve on the offensive line last year, too. 97 percent of fans believed the Lions improved at guard and center in 2015, and we all know how that turned out.

Overall, fans believe the Lions are much improved on offense (74 percent average improvement), while they are a little less optimistic about the defense (61 percent). But perception in June hardly ever accurately represents reality in the fall. We'll have to wait and see just how good this Lions squad is.

*Interestingly enough, the vote for wide receiver was initially heavily in favor of improvement, with the votes being as high as 72 percent at one point. However, after we pointed this out, the "no" votes came in heavily.